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6th Marine Corps District

 

6th Marine Corps District

Marine Corps Recruiting Command

MCRD Parris Island, S.C.
Photos
U.S. Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer Matthew Kessinger, personnel officer of 6th Marine Corps District recites the oath of office during his promotion to chief warrant officer five aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, Dec. 19, 2018. Kessinger, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, has currently served 28 years in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jack A. E. Rigsby)
Nicholas Kessinger pins the rank of chief warrant officer five onto Chief Warrant Officer Matthew Kessinger, personnel officer of 6th Marine Corps District, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, Dec. 19, 2018. Kessinger, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, has currently served 28 years in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jack A. E. Rigsby)
U.S. Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer Matthew Kessinger, personnel officer of 6th Marine Corps District, speaks to guests at his promotion to chief warrant officer five aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, Dec. 19, 2018. Kessinger, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, has currently served 28 years in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jack A. E. Rigsby)
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Cortez L. Brown, sergeant major of 6th Marine Corps District, reads the promotion warrant for Chief Warrant Officer Matthew Kessinger, personnel officer of 6th MCD, during Kessinger's promotion to chief warrant officer five aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, Dec. 19, 2018. Kessinger, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, has currently served 28 years in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jack A. E. Rigsby)
U.S. Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer Matthew Kessinger, personnel officer of 6th Marine Corps District, right, shakes hands with Col. William C. Gray, commanding officer of 6th MCD, during his promotion to chief warrant officer five aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, Dec. 19, 2018. Kessinger, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, has currently served 28 years in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jack A. E. Rigsby)
U.S. Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer Matthew Kessinger, personnel officer of 6th Marine Corps District, stands at the position of attention during his promotion to chief warrant officer five aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, Dec. 19, 2018. Kessinger, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, has currently served 28 years in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jack A. E. Rigsby)
U.S. Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer Matthew Kessinger, personnel officer of 6th Marine Corps District, poses for a photo with his family after his promotion to chief warrant officer five aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, Dec. 19, 2018. Kessinger, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, has currently served 28 years in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jack A. E. Rigsby)
U.S. Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer Matthew Kessinger, personnel officer of 6th Marine Corps District, poses for a photo with the 6th MCD personnel section after his promotion to chief warrant officer five aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, Dec. 19, 2018. Kessinger, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, has currently served 28 years in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jack A. E. Rigsby)
Pfc. Cody C. Parr graduated from Marine recruit training today as the platoon honor graduate of Platoon 1002, Company C, 2nd Battalion, Recruit Training Regiment, for placing first of 79 recruits.
Pfc. Jessee W. Prester graduated from Marine recruit training today as the platoon honor graduate of Platoon 1004, Company C, 2nd Battalion, Recruit Training Regiment, for placing first of 80 recruits.
Pfc. Jacob S. Wesson graduated from Marine recruit training today as the platoon honor graduate of Platoon 1000, Company C, 2nd Battalion, Recruit Training Regiment, for placing first of 79 recruits.
Sergeant Majors from across the Eastern Recruiting Region pose for a group photo with the Marines of the Drill Instructor School.
Sergeant Majors from across the Eastern Recruiting Region pose for a group photo with the Marines of the Drill Instructor School.
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Adrian Calleja, a personnel clerk with 6th Marine Corps District, right, plays a beanbag toss game (corn hole)  with Cpl. Aaron Henrich, an operations clerk with 6th MCD, during the 6th MCD Holiday Dinner at Afterburners aboard Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina, Dec. 14, 2018. Calleja, a native of Oxnard, California, is a graduate of Hueneme High School. Henrich, a native of Shawnee, Kansas, is a graduate of Bentonville High School. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jack A. E. Rigsby)
Judge Tamia Gordon, a former U.S. Marine, presents a United States Marine Corps Excellence in Leadership award to De'Arius Christmas, a Grambling State University linebacker, at the Leadership Awards Coaches Luncheon in New Orleans, Nov 23, 2018. 


“The unifying theme of my remarks was about 'Battles Won' -- analogizing battles won by the Marine Corps and battles won by the players on and off the football field,” said Gordon. 


Gordon currently serves as the associate chief administrative law judge for the Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals, at the New Orleans Field Office. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Nathaniel Cray/Released)
Judge Tamia Gordon, a former U.S. Marine Corps major, center right, gathers with fellow Marines for a "100 Years of Women" ceremony on the football field at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Nov. 24, 2018. 


“I am grateful the Marine Corps continues to invest in the Bayou Classic each year,” said Gordon. "This worthwhile investment builds bridges with prospects and influencers in the African American community." 


Gordon currently serves as the associate chief administrative law judge for the Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals, at the New Orleans Field Office. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Nathaniel Cray/Released)
Judge Tamia Gordon, a former U.S. Marine Corps major, serves a Thanksgiving meal at the New Orleans Convention Center, Nov. 22, 2018. 



“My favorite part of the program (Bayou Classic) is the community service event at the Convention Center, where Marines join local New Orleans volunteers in serving Thanksgiving meals to thousands who would not have meals otherwise,” said Gordon. 



Gordon currently serves as the associate chief administrative law judge for the Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals, at the New Orleans Field Office. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Nathaniel Cray/Released)
U.S. Marine Corps Col. William C. Gray, commanding officer of 6th Marine Corps District, far left, and his wife Debbie Gray, far right, pose for a photo with Mr. and Mrs. Clause, during the 6th MCD Holiday Dinner at Afterburners aboard Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina, Dec. 14, 2018. Vivian and Ray Otto are both natives of Mechanicsville, Virginia. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jack A. E. Rigsby)
Recruiting Sub Station Myrtle Beach poolee Michael Campofiori explains what he had to overcome to be given a chance to go to Marine Corps Recruit Training Depot Parris Island for the chance to become a U.S. Marine. Campofiori, from Brick Township, N.J., has been wanting to become a Marine ever since he was a child, but at the age of 11, he was diagnosed with Leukemia, a medical condition that threatened not only his possibility of joining the Marine Corps, but his life.
Recruiting Sub Station Myrtle Beach poolee Michael Campofiori explains what he had to overcome to be given a chance to go to Marine Corps Recruit Training Depot Parris Island for the chance to become a U.S. Marine. Campofiori, from Brick Township, N.J., has been wanting to become a Marine ever since he was a child, but at the age of 11, he was diagnosed with Leukemia, a medical condition that threatened not only his possibility of joining the Marine Corps, but his life.